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Complex text

Harry Gaylord
I agree with Charles and Bob. With SGML and TEI we have great help in
creating complex text. Congratulation Lou and Michael together with
the others who have brought this about. Peter Robinson's collate is
also a valuable tool, but I can't use it with my unix and dos operating
systems.

I hope and expect we will see a series of applications making use of this
in the public domain and from vendors in the short term.

What Bob seems to be describing is a HyTime document. The implimentation
of that standard on top of TEI and SGML is where research should be
focussing now.

Harry Gaylord

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Re: Complex text

D.A. Schmidt
On Wed, 18 May 1994, Harry Gaylord wrote:

> I agree with Charles and Bob. With SGML and TEI we have great help in
> creating complex text. Congratulation Lou and Michael together with
> the others who have brought this about. Peter Robinson's collate is
> also a valuable tool, but I can't use it with my unix and dos operating
> systems.
>
> I hope and expect we will see a series of applications making use of this
> in the public domain and from vendors in the short term.
>
> What Bob seems to be describing is a HyTime document. The implimentation
> of that standard on top of TEI and SGML is where research should be
> focussing now.
>
> Harry Gaylord
>

So according to you everything is just great. We don't have to make any
improvements. Well, I don't think it's great because it doesn't do what I
want. TEI's system for coding variants at the moment is wooly, and
difficult to implement, as well as encouraging inaccuracy in their
representation.

Desmond Schmidt
Wittgenstein Archive
Cambridge UK.

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Re: Complex text

Harry Gaylord
In reply to this post by Harry Gaylord
>
> So according to you everything is just great. We don't have to make any
> improvements. Well, I don't think it's great because it doesn't do what I
> want. TEI's system for coding variants at the moment is wooly, and
> difficult to implement, as well as encouraging inaccuracy in their
> representation.
>
> Desmond Schmidt
> Wittgenstein Archive
> Cambridge UK.

I never said we don't need improvements. All of us who worked on TEI are
acutely aware of what still needs to be done. You will see that vividly
in the articles on TEI in CHUM shortly. On critical editions we still need
to tackle many problems which are very complex. We must arrive at a general
agreement on extensions of TEI which affect all of us working on mss in
their complexity. We also need to make extensions for specific languages
and cultures and the academic traditions of their study. Slavists, for
example, feel that they have very special problems and do Japanese scholars
with their character representation problems. In addition specific projects
have their own special problems which will have to be dealt with by
themselves or in cooperation with others.

TEI has cooperated closely with the experts on ISO SC18/WG8 in the
development of HyTime and contributed greatly to the query mechanisms
in that standard. SGML itself has limitations and those writing SGML
systems have not adequately supported CONCUR which would have helped us
a lot, as we have repeatedly said. HyTime and the forthcoming DSSSL have
mechanisms to deal with these problems above SGML. I, myself, intend
to use all of these for building tools which will turn our medieval
heritage into sources which we can more profitably explore electronically.

Of course, one prefers to enjoy reading a physical book than its electronic
form. However, I as an editor can use my time better working on a critical
edition electronically in which I have direct access to the readings and
images of folios from mss presently residing in Sofia, Panagurste in
Bulgaria, Krk, Zagreb, Belgrade, Moscow, Leningrad, Warsaw, and St.
Catherina, than in my typewritten edition made before I had access to
computers and the large notebooks of photocopies of microfilms and the
notebooks of my commentary, and my notebooks in my cramped hand, made
on the spot with the manuscripts in hand. If I had only had a laptop
in those days.

Harry Gaylord