Dealing with an abbreviation that expands to multiple lines of verse

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Dealing with an abbreviation that expands to multiple lines of verse

Raffaele Viglianti-2
Dear List,

We're encoding a number of early-modern songs for a pilot project and we are wondering how to deal with a special form of abbreviation and its expansion.

An example: image from EEBO

You can see at the bottom of the left page that the last line reads: "But I have vow'd, &c.". The "&c." indicates that the rest of the refrain is to be sung; you can find it underlain in the score above, starting at about a third of the page: 
"But I have vow'd, and never muſt 
your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you 
for if he break you may diſtruſt, 
the vow he made to love you too.".

We would like to encode both the "&c." and the expansion, but since this spans multiple lines, we are not able to use <choice> with <abbr> and <expan>. What should we do instead?

<lg type="stanza">
  <!-- first lines -->
  <l>About with him he bears the rage,</l>
  <l>And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
  <l>But I have vow'd, &amp;c.</l>
  <!-- Insert expanded refrain here -->
</lg>

We could link together expansions, but the choice remains somewhat incomplete, as it only wraps the first part of the expansion:

<l>But I have vow'd, <choice><abbr>&amp;c.</abbr><expan xml:id="ex1" next="#ex2">and never must</expan></choice></l>
<l><expan xml:id="ex2" prev="#ex1" next="#ex3">your banish'd servant trouble you</expan></l>
<l><expan xml:id="ex3" prev="#ex2" next="#ex4">for if he break you may distrust,</expan></l>
<l><expan xml:id="ex4" prev="#ex3">the vow he made to love you too.</expan></l>


Another possibility could be wrapping the refrain in a nested <lg> and give it a subtype, but I'm not too happy about it. It also doesn't indicate clearly what was on the original document and what was expanded because "But I have vow'd," gets bundled with the rest.
  <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
  <lg type="refrain" subtype="expanded">
    <l>But I have vow'd, 
      <choice>
        <abbr>&amp;c.</abbr>
        <expan>and never muſt</expan>
      </choice>
    </l>            
    <l>your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you</l>
    <l>for if he break you may diſtruſt,</l>
    <l><expan>the vow he made to love you too.</expan></l>
  </lg>                        
</lg>            

Thanks for any advice you can provide!

Raff

-- 
Raffaele Viglianti, PhD
Research Programmer
Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
University of Maryland
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Re: Dealing with an abbreviation that expands to multiple lines of verse

Paul Schaffner
Could you use choice / orig / supplied instead?  Supplied may contain
lg.

This sort of thing is, of course, very very common, and not
confined to refrains. Books of liturgy, for example, invariably
conclude a prayer with "Pater Noster, &c." rather than repeat
the entire Lord's prayer every time it is needed.

pfs

On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 15:47, Raffaele Viglianti wrote:

> Dear List,
>
> We're encoding a number of early-modern songs for a pilot project and we
> are wondering how to deal with a special form of abbreviation and its
> expansion.
>
> An example: image from EEBO
> <https://eebo.chadwyck.com/search/full_rec?SOURCE=pgimages.cfg&ACTION=ByID&ID=13587622&FILE=CITATIONS&SEARCHSCREEN=param(SEARCHSCREEN)&VID=100600&PAGENO=18&ZOOM=100&VIEWPORT=&SEARCHCONFIG=undefined&DISPLAY=param(DISPLAY)&HIGHLIGHT_KEYWORD=undefined>
>
> You can see at the bottom of the left page that the last line reads: "But
> I
> have vow'd, &c.". The "&c." indicates that the rest of the refrain is to
> be
> sung; you can find it underlain in the score above, starting at about a
> third of the page:
> "But I have vow'd, and never muſt
> your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you
> for if he break you may diſtruſt,
> the vow he made to love you too.".
>
> We would like to encode both the "&c." and the expansion, but since this
> spans multiple lines, we are not able to use <choice> with <abbr> and
> <expan>. What should we do instead?
>
> <lg type="stanza">
>   <!-- first lines -->
>   <l>About with him he bears the rage,</l>
>   <l>And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
>   <l>But I have vow'd, &amp;c.</l>
>   <!-- Insert expanded refrain here -->
> </lg>
>
> We could link together expansions, but the choice remains somewhat
> incomplete, as it only wraps the first part of the expansion:
>
> <l>But I have vow'd, <choice><abbr>&amp;c.</abbr><expan xml:id="ex1"
> next="#ex2">and never must</expan></choice></l>
> <l><expan xml:id="ex2" prev="#ex1" next="#ex3">your banish'd servant
> trouble you</expan></l>
> <l><expan xml:id="ex3" prev="#ex2" next="#ex4">for if he break you may
> distrust,</expan></l>
> <l><expan xml:id="ex4" prev="#ex3">the vow he made to love you
> too.</expan></l>
>
>
> Another possibility could be wrapping the refrain in a nested <lg> and
> give
> it a subtype, but I'm not too happy about it. It also doesn't indicate
> clearly what was on the original document and what was expanded because
> "But I have vow'd," gets bundled with the rest.
>   <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
>   <lg type="refrain" subtype="expanded">
>     <l>But I have vow'd,
>       <choice>
>         <abbr>&amp;c.</abbr>
>         <expan>and never muſt</expan>
>       </choice>
>     </l>
>     <l>your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you</l>
>     <l>for if he break you may diſtruſt,</l>
>     <l><expan>the vow he made to love you too.</expan></l>
>   </lg>
> </lg>
>
> Thanks for any advice you can provide!
>
> Raff
>
> --
> Raffaele Viglianti, PhD
> Research Programmer
> Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
> University of Maryland


--
Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
University of Michigan Libraries
[hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/
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Re: Dealing with an abbreviation that expands to multiple lines of verse

Paul Schaffner
Looking quickly into a 1958 Lutheran service book, I see introits
that invariably conclude "Glory be to the Father ... " (with the
remainder intended to be supplied); and 'prefaces' that typically
end "Therefore with Angels, etc.", where the "etc." is meant to be
expanded into not one but two hymns (a transitional piece, followed
by the Sanctus, each of which has musical notation, bylines, titles,
musical instructions, etc. I'm fairly sure that these are the same
*sort* of thing as your omitted refrains, though more complicated;
that similar things could be found in (e.g.) books of law; and that
all of these are weightier than <abbr> was intended to carry.

pfs

On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 17:52, Paul Schaffner wrote:

> Could you use choice / orig / supplied instead?  Supplied may contain
> lg.
>
> This sort of thing is, of course, very very common, and not
> confined to refrains. Books of liturgy, for example, invariably
> conclude a prayer with "Pater Noster, &c." rather than repeat
> the entire Lord's prayer every time it is needed.
>
> pfs
>
> On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 15:47, Raffaele Viglianti wrote:
> > Dear List,
> >
> > We're encoding a number of early-modern songs for a pilot project and we
> > are wondering how to deal with a special form of abbreviation and its
> > expansion.
> >
> > An example: image from EEBO
> > <https://eebo.chadwyck.com/search/full_rec?SOURCE=pgimages.cfg&ACTION=ByID&ID=13587622&FILE=CITATIONS&SEARCHSCREEN=param(SEARCHSCREEN)&VID=100600&PAGENO=18&ZOOM=100&VIEWPORT=&SEARCHCONFIG=undefined&DISPLAY=param(DISPLAY)&HIGHLIGHT_KEYWORD=undefined>
> >
> > You can see at the bottom of the left page that the last line reads: "But
> > I
> > have vow'd, &c.". The "&c." indicates that the rest of the refrain is to
> > be
> > sung; you can find it underlain in the score above, starting at about a
> > third of the page:
> > "But I have vow'd, and never muſt
> > your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you
> > for if he break you may diſtruſt,
> > the vow he made to love you too.".
> >
> > We would like to encode both the "&c." and the expansion, but since this
> > spans multiple lines, we are not able to use <choice> with <abbr> and
> > <expan>. What should we do instead?
> >
> > <lg type="stanza">
> >   <!-- first lines -->
> >   <l>About with him he bears the rage,</l>
> >   <l>And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
> >   <l>But I have vow'd, &amp;c.</l>
> >   <!-- Insert expanded refrain here -->
> > </lg>
> >
> > We could link together expansions, but the choice remains somewhat
> > incomplete, as it only wraps the first part of the expansion:
> >
> > <l>But I have vow'd, <choice><abbr>&amp;c.</abbr><expan xml:id="ex1"
> > next="#ex2">and never must</expan></choice></l>
> > <l><expan xml:id="ex2" prev="#ex1" next="#ex3">your banish'd servant
> > trouble you</expan></l>
> > <l><expan xml:id="ex3" prev="#ex2" next="#ex4">for if he break you may
> > distrust,</expan></l>
> > <l><expan xml:id="ex4" prev="#ex3">the vow he made to love you
> > too.</expan></l>
> >
> >
> > Another possibility could be wrapping the refrain in a nested <lg> and
> > give
> > it a subtype, but I'm not too happy about it. It also doesn't indicate
> > clearly what was on the original document and what was expanded because
> > "But I have vow'd," gets bundled with the rest.
> >   <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
> >   <lg type="refrain" subtype="expanded">
> >     <l>But I have vow'd,
> >       <choice>
> >         <abbr>&amp;c.</abbr>
> >         <expan>and never muſt</expan>
> >       </choice>
> >     </l>
> >     <l>your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you</l>
> >     <l>for if he break you may diſtruſt,</l>
> >     <l><expan>the vow he made to love you too.</expan></l>
> >   </lg>
> > </lg>
> >
> > Thanks for any advice you can provide!
> >
> > Raff
> >
> > --
> > Raffaele Viglianti, PhD
> > Research Programmer
> > Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
> > University of Maryland
>
>
> --
> Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
> University of Michigan Libraries
> [hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/


--
Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
University of Michigan Libraries
[hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/
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Re: Dealing with an abbreviation that expands to multiple lines of verse

Lou Burnard-6

I agree with Paul, both that this a relatively frequent phenomenon, and that it is not what ABBR is meant for. "&c" is an abbbreviation, of course, but its expansion is "etcetera", not whatever fragment of text we think is meant to be indicated here. 

In the absence of a more specific tag (<refrain>, <include>, <repeat>...) I'd suggest <ref> is an appropriate way of marking all these phenomena.

Some imaginary examples:

&lt;ref type="refrain" target="#firstOccurrenceOfRepeatedRefrain">With a Hey ho &c</ref>

&lt;ref type="inclusion" target="tei:theLordsPrayer"/>

&lt;ref type="citation" target="#S12">Smith 12</ref>
 
On 25/09/17 23:13, Paul Schaffner wrote:
Looking quickly into a 1958 Lutheran service book, I see introits
that invariably conclude "Glory be to the Father ... " (with the
remainder intended to be supplied); and 'prefaces' that typically
end "Therefore with Angels, etc.", where the "etc." is meant to be
expanded into not one but two hymns (a transitional piece, followed
by the Sanctus, each of which has musical notation, bylines, titles,
musical instructions, etc. I'm fairly sure that these are the same
*sort* of thing as your omitted refrains, though more complicated;
that similar things could be found in (e.g.) books of law; and that
all of these are weightier than <abbr> was intended to carry.

pfs

On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 17:52, Paul Schaffner wrote:
Could you use choice / orig / supplied instead?  Supplied may contain
lg.

This sort of thing is, of course, very very common, and not
confined to refrains. Books of liturgy, for example, invariably
conclude a prayer with "Pater Noster, &c." rather than repeat
the entire Lord's prayer every time it is needed.

pfs

On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 15:47, Raffaele Viglianti wrote:
Dear List,

We're encoding a number of early-modern songs for a pilot project and we
are wondering how to deal with a special form of abbreviation and its
expansion.

An example: image from EEBO
<https://eebo.chadwyck.com/search/full_rec?SOURCE=pgimages.cfg&ACTION=ByID&ID=13587622&FILE=CITATIONS&SEARCHSCREEN=param(SEARCHSCREEN)&VID=100600&PAGENO=18&ZOOM=100&VIEWPORT=&SEARCHCONFIG=undefined&DISPLAY=param(DISPLAY)&HIGHLIGHT_KEYWORD=undefined>

You can see at the bottom of the left page that the last line reads: "But
I
have vow'd, &c.". The "&c." indicates that the rest of the refrain is to
be
sung; you can find it underlain in the score above, starting at about a
third of the page:
"But I have vow'd, and never muſt
your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you
for if he break you may diſtruſt,
the vow he made to love you too.".

We would like to encode both the "&c." and the expansion, but since this
spans multiple lines, we are not able to use <choice> with <abbr> and
<expan>. What should we do instead?

<lg type="stanza">
  <!-- first lines -->
  <l>About with him he bears the rage,</l>
  <l>And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
  <l>But I have vow'd, &amp;c.</l>
  <!-- Insert expanded refrain here -->
</lg>

We could link together expansions, but the choice remains somewhat
incomplete, as it only wraps the first part of the expansion:

<l>But I have vow'd, <choice><abbr>&amp;c.</abbr><expan xml:id="ex1"
next="#ex2">and never must</expan></choice></l>
<l><expan xml:id="ex2" prev="#ex1" next="#ex3">your banish'd servant
trouble you</expan></l>
<l><expan xml:id="ex3" prev="#ex2" next="#ex4">for if he break you may
distrust,</expan></l>
<l><expan xml:id="ex4" prev="#ex3">the vow he made to love you
too.</expan></l>


Another possibility could be wrapping the refrain in a nested <lg> and
give
it a subtype, but I'm not too happy about it. It also doesn't indicate
clearly what was on the original document and what was expanded because
"But I have vow'd," gets bundled with the rest.
  <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
  <lg type="refrain" subtype="expanded">
    <l>But I have vow'd,
      <choice>
        <abbr>&amp;c.</abbr>
        <expan>and never muſt</expan>
      </choice>
    </l>
    <l>your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you</l>
    <l>for if he break you may diſtruſt,</l>
    <l><expan>the vow he made to love you too.</expan></l>
  </lg>
</lg>

Thanks for any advice you can provide!

Raff

-- 
Raffaele Viglianti, PhD
Research Programmer
Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
University of Maryland

-- 
Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
University of Michigan Libraries
[hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/


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Re: Dealing with an abbreviation that expands to multiple lines of verse

Raffaele Viglianti-2
Thank you Paul and Lou, very helpful advice.

Lou, you're absolutely right that the expansion of "&c." is "etcetera". And it makes a lot of sense to see it as a <ref>, which possibly makes it unnecessary to provide the refrain text explicitly (e.g. via a <reg> as Paul suggested). So what about a solution like the one below?

<lg type="stanza">
  <!-- previous lines -->
  <l xml:id="r1">But I have vow'd, <seg xml:id="r1Part">and never must</seg></l>
  <l xml:id="r2">your banish'd servant trouble you</l>
  <l xml:id="r3">for if he break you may distrust,</l>
  <l xml:id="r4">the vow he made to love you too.</l>
</lg>

<lg type="stanza">
  <!-- previous lines -->
  <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
  <l rend="indent3">But I have vow'd, <ref target="#r1Part #r2 #r3 #r4">&amp;c.</ref></l>
</lg>

Or, to simplify things further, one could also see the entire line as a reference to the refrain, not just the &c.

This, however, doesn't resolve the awkwardness of using phrase-level markup for something that spans over verse lines: simply replacing the <ref> with the targets would be wrong. It may be clear enough to build an ad hoc solution, but can we do this better?

Thanks,
Raff

On Tue, Sep 26, 2017 at 4:51 AM, Lou Burnard <[hidden email]> wrote:

I agree with Paul, both that this a relatively frequent phenomenon, and that it is not what ABBR is meant for. "&c" is an abbbreviation, of course, but its expansion is "etcetera", not whatever fragment of text we think is meant to be indicated here. 

In the absence of a more specific tag (<refrain>, <include>, <repeat>...) I'd suggest <ref> is an appropriate way of marking all these phenomena.

Some imaginary examples:

&lt;ref type="refrain" target="#firstOccurrenceOfRepeatedRefrain">With a Hey ho &c</ref>

&lt;ref type="inclusion" target="tei:theLordsPrayer"/>

&lt;ref type="citation" target="#S12">Smith 12</ref>

 
On 25/09/17 23:13, Paul Schaffner wrote:
Looking quickly into a 1958 Lutheran service book, I see introits
that invariably conclude "Glory be to the Father ... " (with the
remainder intended to be supplied); and 'prefaces' that typically
end "Therefore with Angels, etc.", where the "etc." is meant to be
expanded into not one but two hymns (a transitional piece, followed
by the Sanctus, each of which has musical notation, bylines, titles,
musical instructions, etc. I'm fairly sure that these are the same
*sort* of thing as your omitted refrains, though more complicated;
that similar things could be found in (e.g.) books of law; and that
all of these are weightier than <abbr> was intended to carry.

pfs

On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 17:52, Paul Schaffner wrote:
Could you use choice / orig / supplied instead?  Supplied may contain
lg.

This sort of thing is, of course, very very common, and not
confined to refrains. Books of liturgy, for example, invariably
conclude a prayer with "Pater Noster, &c." rather than repeat
the entire Lord's prayer every time it is needed.

pfs

On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 15:47, Raffaele Viglianti wrote:
Dear List,

We're encoding a number of early-modern songs for a pilot project and we
are wondering how to deal with a special form of abbreviation and its
expansion.

An example: image from EEBO
<https://eebo.chadwyck.com/search/full_rec?SOURCE=pgimages.cfg&ACTION=ByID&ID=13587622&FILE=CITATIONS&SEARCHSCREEN=param(SEARCHSCREEN)&VID=100600&PAGENO=18&ZOOM=100&VIEWPORT=&SEARCHCONFIG=undefined&DISPLAY=param(DISPLAY)&HIGHLIGHT_KEYWORD=undefined>

You can see at the bottom of the left page that the last line reads: "But
I
have vow'd, &c.". The "&c." indicates that the rest of the refrain is to
be
sung; you can find it underlain in the score above, starting at about a
third of the page:
"But I have vow'd, and never muſt
your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you
for if he break you may diſtruſt,
the vow he made to love you too.".

We would like to encode both the "&c." and the expansion, but since this
spans multiple lines, we are not able to use <choice> with <abbr> and
<expan>. What should we do instead?

<lg type="stanza">
  <!-- first lines -->
  <l>About with him he bears the rage,</l>
  <l>And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
  <l>But I have vow'd, &amp;c.</l>
  <!-- Insert expanded refrain here -->
</lg>

We could link together expansions, but the choice remains somewhat
incomplete, as it only wraps the first part of the expansion:

<l>But I have vow'd, <choice><abbr>&amp;c.</abbr><expan xml:id="ex1"
next="#ex2">and never must</expan></choice></l>
<l><expan xml:id="ex2" prev="#ex1" next="#ex3">your banish'd servant
trouble you</expan></l>
<l><expan xml:id="ex3" prev="#ex2" next="#ex4">for if he break you may
distrust,</expan></l>
<l><expan xml:id="ex4" prev="#ex3">the vow he made to love you
too.</expan></l>


Another possibility could be wrapping the refrain in a nested <lg> and
give
it a subtype, but I'm not too happy about it. It also doesn't indicate
clearly what was on the original document and what was expanded because
"But I have vow'd," gets bundled with the rest.
  <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
  <lg type="refrain" subtype="expanded">
    <l>But I have vow'd,
      <choice>
        <abbr>&amp;c.</abbr>
        <expan>and never muſt</expan>
      </choice>
    </l>
    <l>your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you</l>
    <l>for if he break you may diſtruſt,</l>
    <l><expan>the vow he made to love you too.</expan></l>
  </lg>
</lg>

Thanks for any advice you can provide!

Raff

-- 
Raffaele Viglianti, PhD
Research Programmer
Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
University of Maryland
-- 
Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
University of Michigan Libraries
[hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/

    


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Re: Dealing with an abbreviation that expands to multiple lines of verse

Paul Schaffner
Assuming that the refrain appears in its full form somewhere in
the text, could you resort to something like this?

<lg type="refrain_full" xml:id="refrain1">
<l>...</l>
<l>...</l>
<l>...</l>
</lg>

* * *

<lg type="refrain_abbreviated" sameas="#refrain1">
<l>Green grow the rushes &c.</l>
</lg>

pfs


On Tue, Sep 26, 2017, at 10:20, Raffaele Viglianti wrote:

> Thank you Paul and Lou, very helpful advice.
>
> Lou, you're absolutely right that the expansion of "&c." is "etcetera".
> And
> it makes a lot of sense to see it as a <ref>, which possibly makes it
> unnecessary to provide the refrain text explicitly (e.g. via a <reg> as
> Paul suggested). So what about a solution like the one below?
>
> <lg type="stanza">
>   <!-- previous lines -->
>   <l xml:id="r1">But I have vow'd, <seg xml:id="r1Part">and never
> must</seg></l>
>   <l xml:id="r2">your banish'd servant trouble you</l>
>   <l xml:id="r3">for if he break you may distrust,</l>
>   <l xml:id="r4">the vow he made to love you too.</l>
> </lg>
>
> <lg type="stanza">
>   <!-- previous lines -->
>   <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
>   <l rend="indent3">But I have vow'd, <ref target="#r1Part #r2 #r3
> #r4">&amp;c.</ref></l>
> </lg>
>
> Or, to simplify things further, one could also see the entire line as a
> reference to the refrain, not just the &c.
>
> This, however, doesn't resolve the awkwardness of using phrase-level
> markup
> for something that spans over verse lines: simply replacing the <ref>
> with
> the targets would be wrong. It may be clear enough to build an ad hoc
> solution, but can we do this better?
>
> Thanks,
> Raff
>
> On Tue, Sep 26, 2017 at 4:51 AM, Lou Burnard
> <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > I agree with Paul, both that this a relatively frequent phenomenon, and
> > that it is not what ABBR is meant for. "&c" is an abbbreviation, of course,
> > but its expansion is "etcetera", not whatever fragment of text we think
> > is meant to be indicated here.
> >
> > In the absence of a more specific tag (<refrain>, <include>, <repeat>...)
> > I'd suggest <ref> is an appropriate way of marking all these phenomena.
> >
> > Some imaginary examples:
> >
> > &lt;ref type="refrain" target="#firstOccurrenceOfRepeatedRefrain">With a
> > Hey ho &c</ref>
> > &lt;ref type="inclusion" target="tei:theLordsPrayer"/>
> >
> > &lt;ref type="citation" target="#S12">Smith 12</ref>
> >
> >
> > On 25/09/17 23:13, Paul Schaffner wrote:
> >
> > Looking quickly into a 1958 Lutheran service book, I see introits
> > that invariably conclude "Glory be to the Father ... " (with the
> > remainder intended to be supplied); and 'prefaces' that typically
> > end "Therefore with Angels, etc.", where the "etc." is meant to be
> > expanded into not one but two hymns (a transitional piece, followed
> > by the Sanctus, each of which has musical notation, bylines, titles,
> > musical instructions, etc. I'm fairly sure that these are the same
> > *sort* of thing as your omitted refrains, though more complicated;
> > that similar things could be found in (e.g.) books of law; and that
> > all of these are weightier than <abbr> was intended to carry.
> >
> > pfs
> >
> > On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 17:52, Paul Schaffner wrote:
> >
> > Could you use choice / orig / supplied instead?  Supplied may contain
> > lg.
> >
> > This sort of thing is, of course, very very common, and not
> > confined to refrains. Books of liturgy, for example, invariably
> > conclude a prayer with "Pater Noster, &c." rather than repeat
> > the entire Lord's prayer every time it is needed.
> >
> > pfs
> >
> > On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 15:47, Raffaele Viglianti wrote:
> >
> > Dear List,
> >
> > We're encoding a number of early-modern songs for a pilot project and we
> > are wondering how to deal with a special form of abbreviation and its
> > expansion.
> >
> > An example: image from EEBO<https://eebo.chadwyck.com/search/full_rec?SOURCE=pgimages.cfg&ACTION=ByID&ID=13587622&FILE=CITATIONS&SEARCHSCREEN=param(SEARCHSCREEN)&VID=100600&PAGENO=18&ZOOM=100&VIEWPORT=&SEARCHCONFIG=undefined&DISPLAY=param(DISPLAY)&HIGHLIGHT_KEYWORD=undefined> <https://eebo.chadwyck.com/search/full_rec?SOURCE=pgimages.cfg&ACTION=ByID&ID=13587622&FILE=CITATIONS&SEARCHSCREEN=param(SEARCHSCREEN)&VID=100600&PAGENO=18&ZOOM=100&VIEWPORT=&SEARCHCONFIG=undefined&DISPLAY=param(DISPLAY)&HIGHLIGHT_KEYWORD=undefined>
> >
> > You can see at the bottom of the left page that the last line reads: "But
> > I
> > have vow'd, &c.". The "&c." indicates that the rest of the refrain is to
> > be
> > sung; you can find it underlain in the score above, starting at about a
> > third of the page:
> > "But I have vow'd, and never muſt
> > your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you
> > for if he break you may diſtruſt,
> > the vow he made to love you too.".
> >
> > We would like to encode both the "&c." and the expansion, but since this
> > spans multiple lines, we are not able to use <choice> with <abbr> and
> > <expan>. What should we do instead?
> >
> > <lg type="stanza">
> >   <!-- first lines -->
> >   <l>About with him he bears the rage,</l>
> >   <l>And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
> >   <l>But I have vow'd, &amp;c.</l>
> >   <!-- Insert expanded refrain here -->
> > </lg>
> >
> > We could link together expansions, but the choice remains somewhat
> > incomplete, as it only wraps the first part of the expansion:
> >
> > <l>But I have vow'd, <choice><abbr>&amp;c.</abbr><expan xml:id="ex1"
> > next="#ex2">and never must</expan></choice></l>
> > <l><expan xml:id="ex2" prev="#ex1" next="#ex3">your banish'd servant
> > trouble you</expan></l>
> > <l><expan xml:id="ex3" prev="#ex2" next="#ex4">for if he break you may
> > distrust,</expan></l>
> > <l><expan xml:id="ex4" prev="#ex3">the vow he made to love you
> > too.</expan></l>
> >
> >
> > Another possibility could be wrapping the refrain in a nested <lg> and
> > give
> > it a subtype, but I'm not too happy about it. It also doesn't indicate
> > clearly what was on the original document and what was expanded because
> > "But I have vow'd," gets bundled with the rest.
> >   <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
> >   <lg type="refrain" subtype="expanded">
> >     <l>But I have vow'd,
> >       <choice>
> >         <abbr>&amp;c.</abbr>
> >         <expan>and never muſt</expan>
> >       </choice>
> >     </l>
> >     <l>your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you</l>
> >     <l>for if he break you may diſtruſt,</l>
> >     <l><expan>the vow he made to love you too.</expan></l>
> >   </lg>
> > </lg>
> >
> > Thanks for any advice you can provide!
> >
> > Raff
> >
> > --
> > Raffaele Viglianti, PhD
> > Research Programmer
> > Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
> > University of Maryland
> >
> >
> > --
> > Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
> > University of Michigan [hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/
> >
> >
> >


--
Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
University of Michigan Libraries
[hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/
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Re: Dealing with an abbreviation that expands to multiple lines of verse

Paul Schaffner
Here's a slight variant on what I think
is the same question, a familiar hymn as printed
in the 'Hymnal for Evangelical Lutheran Missions'
(St. Louis: Concordia, 1905).

Guide me, O Thou great Jehovah,
Pilgrim through this barren land;
I am weak, but Thou art mighty,
Hold me with Thy powerful hand:
Bread of heaven, :|:
Feed me till I want no more!

At the end of the fifth line is the generic 'repeat'
sign (not in Unicode, by the way), which, being
interpreted, has the effect of doubling that
fifth line:

<l>Guide me, O Thou great Jehovah,</l>
<l>Pilgrim through this barren land;</l>
<l>I am weak, but Thou art mighty,</l>
<l>Hold me with Thy powerful hand:</l>
<l>Bread of heaven,</l>
<l>Bread of heaven,</l>
<l>Feed me till I want no more!</l>

This use of the repeat sign is a bit unusual, I think,
but not unprecedented.

Page image:
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pfs/tei/guide_me.jpg

This comes perilously close to the problem of 'tagging the
silences' -- capturing text that is present only by implication
from the existence of other text, or even by implication from
the absence of other text :)

pfs



On Tue, Sep 26, 2017, at 10:28, Paul Schaffner wrote:

> Assuming that the refrain appears in its full form somewhere in
> the text, could you resort to something like this?
>
> <lg type="refrain_full" xml:id="refrain1">
> <l>...</l>
> <l>...</l>
> <l>...</l>
> </lg>
>
> * * *
>
> <lg type="refrain_abbreviated" sameas="#refrain1">
> <l>Green grow the rushes &c.</l>
> </lg>
>
> pfs
>
>
> On Tue, Sep 26, 2017, at 10:20, Raffaele Viglianti wrote:
> > Thank you Paul and Lou, very helpful advice.
> >
> > Lou, you're absolutely right that the expansion of "&c." is "etcetera".
> > And
> > it makes a lot of sense to see it as a <ref>, which possibly makes it
> > unnecessary to provide the refrain text explicitly (e.g. via a <reg> as
> > Paul suggested). So what about a solution like the one below?
> >
> > <lg type="stanza">
> >   <!-- previous lines -->
> >   <l xml:id="r1">But I have vow'd, <seg xml:id="r1Part">and never
> > must</seg></l>
> >   <l xml:id="r2">your banish'd servant trouble you</l>
> >   <l xml:id="r3">for if he break you may distrust,</l>
> >   <l xml:id="r4">the vow he made to love you too.</l>
> > </lg>
> >
> > <lg type="stanza">
> >   <!-- previous lines -->
> >   <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
> >   <l rend="indent3">But I have vow'd, <ref target="#r1Part #r2 #r3
> > #r4">&amp;c.</ref></l>
> > </lg>
> >
> > Or, to simplify things further, one could also see the entire line as a
> > reference to the refrain, not just the &c.
> >
> > This, however, doesn't resolve the awkwardness of using phrase-level
> > markup
> > for something that spans over verse lines: simply replacing the <ref>
> > with
> > the targets would be wrong. It may be clear enough to build an ad hoc
> > solution, but can we do this better?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Raff
> >
> > On Tue, Sep 26, 2017 at 4:51 AM, Lou Burnard
> > <[hidden email]>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > I agree with Paul, both that this a relatively frequent phenomenon, and
> > > that it is not what ABBR is meant for. "&c" is an abbbreviation, of course,
> > > but its expansion is "etcetera", not whatever fragment of text we think
> > > is meant to be indicated here.
> > >
> > > In the absence of a more specific tag (<refrain>, <include>, <repeat>...)
> > > I'd suggest <ref> is an appropriate way of marking all these phenomena.
> > >
> > > Some imaginary examples:
> > >
> > > &lt;ref type="refrain" target="#firstOccurrenceOfRepeatedRefrain">With a
> > > Hey ho &c</ref>
> > > &lt;ref type="inclusion" target="tei:theLordsPrayer"/>
> > >
> > > &lt;ref type="citation" target="#S12">Smith 12</ref>
> > >
> > >
> > > On 25/09/17 23:13, Paul Schaffner wrote:
> > >
> > > Looking quickly into a 1958 Lutheran service book, I see introits
> > > that invariably conclude "Glory be to the Father ... " (with the
> > > remainder intended to be supplied); and 'prefaces' that typically
> > > end "Therefore with Angels, etc.", where the "etc." is meant to be
> > > expanded into not one but two hymns (a transitional piece, followed
> > > by the Sanctus, each of which has musical notation, bylines, titles,
> > > musical instructions, etc. I'm fairly sure that these are the same
> > > *sort* of thing as your omitted refrains, though more complicated;
> > > that similar things could be found in (e.g.) books of law; and that
> > > all of these are weightier than <abbr> was intended to carry.
> > >
> > > pfs
> > >
> > > On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 17:52, Paul Schaffner wrote:
> > >
> > > Could you use choice / orig / supplied instead?  Supplied may contain
> > > lg.
> > >
> > > This sort of thing is, of course, very very common, and not
> > > confined to refrains. Books of liturgy, for example, invariably
> > > conclude a prayer with "Pater Noster, &c." rather than repeat
> > > the entire Lord's prayer every time it is needed.
> > >
> > > pfs
> > >
> > > On Mon, Sep 25, 2017, at 15:47, Raffaele Viglianti wrote:
> > >
> > > Dear List,
> > >
> > > We're encoding a number of early-modern songs for a pilot project and we
> > > are wondering how to deal with a special form of abbreviation and its
> > > expansion.
> > >
> > > An example: image from EEBO<https://eebo.chadwyck.com/search/full_rec?SOURCE=pgimages.cfg&ACTION=ByID&ID=13587622&FILE=CITATIONS&SEARCHSCREEN=param(SEARCHSCREEN)&VID=100600&PAGENO=18&ZOOM=100&VIEWPORT=&SEARCHCONFIG=undefined&DISPLAY=param(DISPLAY)&HIGHLIGHT_KEYWORD=undefined> <https://eebo.chadwyck.com/search/full_rec?SOURCE=pgimages.cfg&ACTION=ByID&ID=13587622&FILE=CITATIONS&SEARCHSCREEN=param(SEARCHSCREEN)&VID=100600&PAGENO=18&ZOOM=100&VIEWPORT=&SEARCHCONFIG=undefined&DISPLAY=param(DISPLAY)&HIGHLIGHT_KEYWORD=undefined>
> > >
> > > You can see at the bottom of the left page that the last line reads: "But
> > > I
> > > have vow'd, &c.". The "&c." indicates that the rest of the refrain is to
> > > be
> > > sung; you can find it underlain in the score above, starting at about a
> > > third of the page:
> > > "But I have vow'd, and never muſt
> > > your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you
> > > for if he break you may diſtruſt,
> > > the vow he made to love you too.".
> > >
> > > We would like to encode both the "&c." and the expansion, but since this
> > > spans multiple lines, we are not able to use <choice> with <abbr> and
> > > <expan>. What should we do instead?
> > >
> > > <lg type="stanza">
> > >   <!-- first lines -->
> > >   <l>About with him he bears the rage,</l>
> > >   <l>And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
> > >   <l>But I have vow'd, &amp;c.</l>
> > >   <!-- Insert expanded refrain here -->
> > > </lg>
> > >
> > > We could link together expansions, but the choice remains somewhat
> > > incomplete, as it only wraps the first part of the expansion:
> > >
> > > <l>But I have vow'd, <choice><abbr>&amp;c.</abbr><expan xml:id="ex1"
> > > next="#ex2">and never must</expan></choice></l>
> > > <l><expan xml:id="ex2" prev="#ex1" next="#ex3">your banish'd servant
> > > trouble you</expan></l>
> > > <l><expan xml:id="ex3" prev="#ex2" next="#ex4">for if he break you may
> > > distrust,</expan></l>
> > > <l><expan xml:id="ex4" prev="#ex3">the vow he made to love you
> > > too.</expan></l>
> > >
> > >
> > > Another possibility could be wrapping the refrain in a nested <lg> and
> > > give
> > > it a subtype, but I'm not too happy about it. It also doesn't indicate
> > > clearly what was on the original document and what was expanded because
> > > "But I have vow'd," gets bundled with the rest.
> > >   <l rend="indent1">And in his tainted bloud the fire.</l>
> > >   <lg type="refrain" subtype="expanded">
> > >     <l>But I have vow'd,
> > >       <choice>
> > >         <abbr>&amp;c.</abbr>
> > >         <expan>and never muſt</expan>
> > >       </choice>
> > >     </l>
> > >     <l>your baniſh'd ſervant trouble you</l>
> > >     <l>for if he break you may diſtruſt,</l>
> > >     <l><expan>the vow he made to love you too.</expan></l>
> > >   </lg>
> > > </lg>
> > >
> > > Thanks for any advice you can provide!
> > >
> > > Raff
> > >
> > > --
> > > Raffaele Viglianti, PhD
> > > Research Programmer
> > > Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
> > > University of Maryland
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
> > > University of Michigan [hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/
> > >
> > >
> > >
>
>
> --
> Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
> University of Michigan Libraries
> [hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/


--
Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
University of Michigan Libraries
[hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/