Long variants

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Long variants

Kalvesmaki, Joel

TEI list,

 

I’m encoding a critical edition of a work whose top structure is nine chapters and a conclusion. At the end of the conclusion the editor has added two alternative endings attested in different manuscript traditions. Each alternative ending corresponds to a passage in the preceding text that begins with a word midway through chapter 8.1 (a point where the leaf element would not naturally be subdivided) and ends somewhere around 9.2 (neither alternative includes the conclusion). These two alternative endings are not relegated to the apparatus criticus, but are set typographically as part of the main text.

 

I can visualize some TEI ways to approach the problem, but none seem fully satisfactory. Has anyone encoded similar long, spanning variants before? Any examples to point to? If the issue has been discussed already I’ll happily take pointers to the archive (where my searches turned up nothing).

 

Best wishes,

 

jk

--

Joel Kalvesmaki

Managing Editor in Byzantine Studies

Dumbarton Oaks

202 339 6435

 



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Re: Long variants

Elisa Beshero-Bondar
Hi Joel,
The Frankenstein Variorum project that Raff Viglianti and I are working on has some similarly long variant passages! In particular, there's a spot where a late edition adds a chapter and makes extensive changes early on that don't align with the earlier editions at all, and I'm going to have make a space for it. The issue I imagine we are both facing is a question of how to handle the structural elements in the text when they span multiple paragraphs or chapters--it's an overlapping hierarchy issue, isn't it? For us, it most certainly is, and we've been working on it like this:
* We hold our apparatus markup in a separate file and we're using standoff pointers in the <rdg> elements to point to variant passages in each edition
* Each of our editions is encoded in its own distinct file, and so we let each of our editions maintain its own distinct structure. This may be one way to deal with the issue! If a long passage is in a variant reading (multiple paragraphs, a chapter and a half), we break it up with <seg> elements that fit in the edition's own hierarchy. The <seg> is a sort of "hotspot" indicating a passage is variant with others. Attributes hold information about which <app> element they're connected to, and when there are multiple segs inside paragraphs, chapters, etc, the attribute value will indicate what part it is of the long-spanning rdg. 

This is an approach we took in part because the stand-off method helps us deal with overlap issues and also should help us point to location markers in the individual editions rather than try to apply the <app>...</app> elements where they don't fit! I don't know whether this might work for you, but perhaps worth considering?

I wonder whether your code is representing the editorial decisions of the print critical edition, or if you're building a new edition working and getting information from the printed text about the various witnesses? That might make a difference with how you're approaching your own critical apparatus work! 

Cheers,
Elisa


On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 5:02 PM, Kalvesmaki, Joel <[hidden email]> wrote:

TEI list,

 

I’m encoding a critical edition of a work whose top structure is nine chapters and a conclusion. At the end of the conclusion the editor has added two alternative endings attested in different manuscript traditions. Each alternative ending corresponds to a passage in the preceding text that begins with a word midway through chapter 8.1 (a point where the leaf element would not naturally be subdivided) and ends somewhere around 9.2 (neither alternative includes the conclusion). These two alternative endings are not relegated to the apparatus criticus, but are set typographically as part of the main text.

 

I can visualize some TEI ways to approach the problem, but none seem fully satisfactory. Has anyone encoded similar long, spanning variants before? Any examples to point to? If the issue has been discussed already I’ll happily take pointers to the archive (where my searches turned up nothing).

 

Best wishes,

 

jk

--

Joel Kalvesmaki

Managing Editor in Byzantine Studies

Dumbarton Oaks

202 339 6435

 



Disclaimer

The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

This email has been scanned for viruses and malware, and may have been automatically archived by Mimecast Ltd, an innovator in Software as a Service (SaaS) for business, providing a safer and more useful place for your human generated data. Mimecast specializes in security, archiving, and compliance. To find out more Click Here.




--
Elisa Beshero-Bondar, PhD
Director, Center for the Digital Text | Associate Professor of English
University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg | Humanities Division
150 Finoli Drive
Greensburg, PA  15601  USA
E-mail:[hidden email]
Development site: http://newtfire.org
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Re: Long variants

Kalvesmaki, Joel

Dear Elisa,

 

When you release material, I'd happily receive links to some examples, not just for the overlapping problem, but to study your pointing mechanism.


The floor is still open for other suggestions. 


In the meantime, I'll mention here my post-mulling decision. Because I am trying to respect the critical edition, and not create my own, I'll treat these passages as part of the app. crit., even if they look little alike typographically. The editor is trying to show us variations, the sort of thing an app. crit. does.  In this case, I've decided that the semantics of the page are important and its typography not, so in handling elements, I'm steering away from scriptum-oriented interpretations. 


Thanks for your input!


jk

 

Hi Joel,

The Frankenstein Variorum project that Raff Viglianti and I are working on has some similarly long variant passages! In particular, there's a spot where a late edition adds a chapter and makes extensive changes early on that don't align with the earlier editions at all, and I'm going to have make a space for it. The issue I imagine we are both facing is a question of how to handle the structural elements in the text when they span multiple paragraphs or chapters--it's an overlapping hierarchy issue, isn't it? For us, it most certainly is, and we've been working on it like this:

* We hold our apparatus markup in a separate file and we're using standoff pointers in the <rdg> elements to point to variant passages in each edition

* Each of our editions is encoded in its own distinct file, and so we let each of our editions maintain its own distinct structure. This may be one way to deal with the issue! If a long passage is in a variant reading (multiple paragraphs, a chapter and a half), we break it up with <seg> elements that fit in the edition's own hierarchy. The <seg> is a sort of "hotspot" indicating a passage is variant with others. Attributes hold information about which <app> element they're connected to, and when there are multiple segs inside paragraphs, chapters, etc, the attribute value will indicate what part it is of the long-spanning rdg. 

 

This is an approach we took in part because the stand-off method helps us deal with overlap issues and also should help us point to location markers in the individual editions rather than try to apply the <app>...</app> elements where they don't fit! I don't know whether this might work for you, but perhaps worth considering?

 

I wonder whether your code is representing the editorial decisions of the print critical edition, or if you're building a new edition working and getting information from the printed text about the various witnesses? That might make a difference with how you're approaching your own critical apparatus work! 

 

Cheers,

Elisa

 

 

On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 5:02 PM, Kalvesmaki, Joel <[hidden email]> wrote:

TEI list,

 

I’m encoding a critical edition of a work whose top structure is nine chapters and a conclusion. At the end of the conclusion the editor has added two alternative endings attested in different manuscript traditions. Each alternative ending corresponds to a passage in the preceding text that begins with a word midway through chapter 8.1 (a point where the leaf element would not naturally be subdivided) and ends somewhere around 9.2 (neither alternative includes the conclusion). These two alternative endings are not relegated to the apparatus criticus, but are set typographically as part of the main text.

 

I can visualize some TEI ways to approach the problem, but none seem fully satisfactory. Has anyone encoded similar long, spanning variants before? Any examples to point to? If the issue has been discussed already I’ll happily take pointers to the archive (where my searches turned up nothing).

 

Best wishes,

 

jk

--

Joel Kalvesmaki

Managing Editor in Byzantine Studies

Dumbarton Oaks

202 339 6435

 

 

Disclaimer

The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

This email has been scanned for viruses and malware, and may have been automatically archived by Mimecast Ltd, an innovator in Software as a Service (SaaS) for business, providing a safer and more useful place for your human generated data. Mimecast specializes in security, archiving, and compliance. To find out more
Click Here.



 

--

Elisa Beshero-Bondar, PhD
Director, Center for the Digital Text | Associate Professor of English

University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg | Humanities Division
150 Finoli Drive
Greensburg, PA  15601  USA
E-mail:
[hidden email]
Development site: 
http://newtfire.org



Disclaimer

The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

This email has been scanned for viruses and malware, and may have been automatically archived by Mimecast Ltd, an innovator in Software as a Service (SaaS) for business, providing a safer and more useful place for your human generated data. Mimecast specializes in security, archiving, and compliance. To find out more Click Here.