Nested quotations

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
3 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Nested quotations

Peter Christian
I'm just marking up a text in which characters quote conversations
with other characters. Is it OK to mark this up with

      <q>.....<q>.....</q>.....</q>

or is it necessary to some different tag (eg. <cit>) to distinguish
the levels?

Peter Christian


======================================================================
Peter Christian
  Documentation & Training Officer, Computing Service
  Goldsmiths' College
  New Cross                     Phone: 081 694 1450 (direct line)
  London SE14 6NW               Email: [hidden email]
======================================================================

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Nested quotations

David Megginson
>>>>> "Peter" == Peter Christian <[hidden email]> writes:

 > I'm just marking up a text in which characters quote conversations
 > with other characters. Is it OK to mark this up with

 >       <q>.....<q>.....</q>.....</q>

 > or is it necessary to some different tag (eg. <cit>) to distinguish
 > the levels?

It depends on the quality of your post-processor.  This is exactly the
same kind of thing that causes religious wars on the comp.text.sgml
newsgroup, because using SGML (not necessarily TEI) it is possible to
mark the sections and subsections of a document in two different ways:

  <sect1>Section 1
  ...
  <sect2>Subsection 1 (in Section 1)
  ...
  <sect2>Subsection 2 (in Section 1)
  ...
  <sect1>Section 2
  ...

or

  <sect>Section 1
  ...
  <sect>Subsection 2 (in Section 1)
  ...
  </sect>
  <sect>Subsection 2 (in Section 1)
  ...
  </sect>
  </sect>
  <sect>Section 2
  ...
  </sect>

The first type allows the omission of end tags and provides context
for someone not using a good SGML-aware editor (an SGML editor should
be able to tell you how deeply the <sect>'s are nested); the second
requires end-tags and can be a little less clear for the reader, but
it simplifies the DTD, removes any limit on the depth of nesting, and
allows <sect>'s to be moved to different levels without modification.
All of these same arguments apply to <q>'s.

(NB: I haven't looked at the TEI guidelines on subsections for a long
time, so I do not remember what was chosen there).


David

---
David Megginson                Department of English, University of Ottawa,
[hidden email]       Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA  K1N 6N5
[hidden email]    Phone: (613) 564-6850 (Office)
[hidden email]             (613) 564-9175 (FAX)

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Nested quotations

Peter Christian
In reply to this post by Peter Christian
Mark Harcourt ([hidden email]) wrote:
>
...[other helpful comments omitted]..

>
> BUT
>
> Let me ask you a question.  Why does the DTD you are using identify quotation
> marks as identifiable elements of a structured socument in the first place?
> Isn't this a mistake?  What I mean is, you haven't identified any other
> punctuation marks as identifieable elements of the document, have you?  (Such
> is typically only done in textual criticism in SGML.)  Why single out
> quotation marks as a special case of punctuation, as an identifiable element
> of a document on par with, say a paragraph, list, poem, chapter, etc.?
>
> Typically, quotation marks are handled using what are called general entity
> declarations.

Well, the quotation *marks* are of course important, but I'm more
concerned with the content of the quotation: the distinction between
dialogue narrated by the narrator and that narrated by characters
within narrated dialogue - which is matter of structure rather than
just of punctuation.

(Since I'm dealing with a medieval text, the editor's punctuation is
pretty arbitrary anyway, and this sort of thing is in fact punctuated
rather badly, i.e. inconsistently, in printed editions of the texts
I've looked at.)

Peter

======================================================================
Peter Christian
  Documentation & Training Officer, Computing Service
  Goldsmiths' College
  New Cross                     Phone: 081 694 1450 (direct line)
  London SE14 6NW               Email: [hidden email]
======================================================================