Using TEI to encode rhetorical devices

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Using TEI to encode rhetorical devices

Yuval Kramer
Dear TEI mailing list,

I am a doctoral student currently in the planning stages of future research work, and am very interested in the possibility of using xml markup for the purpose of encoding individual early modern works for use of rhetorical devices, prose sentence structures, use of specific imagery and commonplaces. The main idea is to ultimately produce a digital, interactive counterpart to the traditional scholarly edition of a single work, rather than to statistically analyse a large body of works.
I am trying to find information about projects that use similar encoding methods (though not necessarily for early modern literary works), in order to learn about what's being done and better position myself in the field.

Thanks in advance for any guidance in the matter,
Yuval
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Re: Using TEI to encode rhetorical devices

Daniel Johnson
Dear Yuval,

An interesting example publication for you might be "The Injured Islanders" on theĀ Digital Archives and Pacific Cultures project. The web interface (http://pacific.obdurodon.org/InjuredIsland.html) allows users to highlight "cultural interactions" rather than rhetorical devices, but the encoding strategy could be instructive. The underlying TEI file for this publication is here: <http://pacific.obdurodon.org/InjuredIsland.xml>

Best,
Dan


On Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 9:45 AM, Yuval Kramer <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear TEI mailing list,

I am a doctoral student currently in the planning stages of future research work, and am very interested in the possibility of using xml markup for the purpose of encoding individual early modern works for use of rhetorical devices, prose sentence structures, use of specific imagery and commonplaces. The main idea is to ultimately produce a digital, interactive counterpart to the traditional scholarly edition of a single work, rather than to statistically analyse a large body of works.
I am trying to find information about projects that use similar encoding methods (though not necessarily for early modern literary works), in order to learn about what's being done and better position myself in the field.

Thanks in advance for any guidance in the matter,
Yuval



--
Daniel Johnson, Ph.D.
English and Digital Humanities Librarian
Hesburgh Libraries

University of Notre Dame
131 Hesburgh Library
Notre Dame, IN 46556
o: 574-631-3457


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