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Why @type is not allowed in <occupation>

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Why @type is not allowed in <occupation>

ANTONIO ROJAS CASTRO
Dear all, 

I am encoding a very detailed prosopography of a person that had many occupations with the element <occupation>. We would like to distinguish his “main” occupations from his “secondary” occupations. Here is an example:

<person>


<!— some elements here -->


<occupation from="1785">Historiker</occupation>
               <occupation>Jurist</occupation>
               <occupation>Statistiker</occupation>
          
               <occupation>Hofmeister / Söhne des Kanzlers von Gersdorff in Dresden 1743-46</occupation>
               <occupation >PD philos. / Geschichte, Statistik, Natur- und Völkerrecht Marburg 1746-</occupation>
               <occupation>aoP. philos. / Geschichte u. Statistik Göttingen 1748-</occupation>
               <occupation>aoP. iur. / Göttingen April 1753-</occupation>


<!— more elements here -->


</person>



For this reason, I had a look at the content model model.personPart. Most of its elements accepts the attribute @role whereas only <persName>, <state> and <trait> accept the attribute @type. 


Can anyone explain why <occupation> is not permitted to contain a @type attribute? Or is there a better solution for my problem?


Thanks in advance. 


Best,


-- 
Dr. Antonio Rojas Castro
Researcher, Cologne Center for eHumanities
Communication coordinator, EADH
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Re: Why @type is not allowed in <occupation>

Syd Bauman-10
Really good question. I'm not sure I see any reason why <occupation>
should not be a member of att.typed. Could just be an oversight. That
said, I think the expectation was that encoders would use the more
structured @code attribute approach.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0">
  <teiHeader>
    <fileDesc>
      <titleStmt>
        <title>tiny occupation demo</title>
      </titleStmt>
      <publicationStmt>
        <p>unpublished, except on TEI-L as a demo</p>
      </publicationStmt>
      <sourceDesc>
        <p>born digital</p>
      </sourceDesc>
    </fileDesc>
    <encodingDesc>
      <classDecl>
        <taxonomy>
          <category>
            <catDesc>primary</catDesc>
            <category xml:id="to1.hx"><catDesc>Historian</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.ju"><catDesc>Jurist</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.st"><catDesc>Statistician</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.xp"><catDesc>XML Progammer/Analyst</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.pa"><catDesc>Assasin</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.ct"><catDesc>Chemistry teacher</catDesc></category>
          </category>
          <category>
            <catDesc>secondary</catDesc>
            <category xml:id="to2.hm"><catDesc>Courtmaster</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to2.dd"><catDesc>Drug dealer</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to2.em"><catDesc>Embezzler</catDesc></category>
          </category>          
        </taxonomy>
      </classDecl>
    </encodingDesc>
  </teiHeader>
  <text>
    <body>
      <listPerson>
        <person xml:id="WW">
          <persName>White, Walter</persName>
          <occupation from="1992" to="2013" code="#to1.ct"/>
          <occupation from="2008" to="2013" code="#to2.dd"/>
        </person>
      </listPerson>
    </body>
  </text>
</TEI>


> I am encoding a very detailed prosopography of a person that had
> many occupations with the element <occupation>. We would like to
> distinguish his “main” occupations from his “secondary”
> occupations. Here is an example:
>
> <person>
>
> <!— some elements here -->
>
> <occupation from="1785">Historiker</occupation>
>                <occupation>Jurist</occupation>
>                <occupation>Statistiker</occupation>
>
>                <occupation>Hofmeister / Söhne des Kanzlers von Gersdorff in
> Dresden 1743-46</occupation>
>                <occupation >PD philos. / Geschichte, Statistik, Natur- und
> Völkerrecht Marburg 1746-</occupation>
>                <occupation>aoP. philos. / Geschichte u. Statistik Göttingen
> 1748-</occupation>
>                <occupation>aoP. iur. / Göttingen April 1753-</occupation>
>
> <!— more elements here -->
>
> </person>
>
> For this reason, I had a look at the content model model.personPart
> <http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/ref-model.personPart.html>.
> Most of its elements accepts the attribute @role whereas only
> <persName>, <state> and <trait> accept the attribute @type.
>
> Can anyone explain why <occupation> is not permitted to contain a
> @type attribute? Or is there a better solution for my problem?
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Re: Why @type is not allowed in <occupation>

ANTONIO ROJAS CASTRO
Thank you for your answer, Syd.

I would prefer to keep the teiHeader simple and avoid taxonomies because we are dealing winth a lot of prosopographic entries.

Said that, can anyone tell me more about the reasoning behind the @type attribute? I still think it would be the best approach.

Many thanks.

2017-03-03 0:14 GMT+01:00 Syd Bauman <[hidden email]>:
Really good question. I'm not sure I see any reason why <occupation>
should not be a member of att.typed. Could just be an oversight. That
said, I think the expectation was that encoders would use the more
structured @code attribute approach.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0">
  <teiHeader>
    <fileDesc>
      <titleStmt>
        <title>tiny occupation demo</title>
      </titleStmt>
      <publicationStmt>
        <p>unpublished, except on TEI-L as a demo</p>
      </publicationStmt>
      <sourceDesc>
        <p>born digital</p>
      </sourceDesc>
    </fileDesc>
    <encodingDesc>
      <classDecl>
        <taxonomy>
          <category>
            <catDesc>primary</catDesc>
            <category xml:id="to1.hx"><catDesc>Historian</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.ju"><catDesc>Jurist</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.st"><catDesc>Statistician</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.xp"><catDesc>XML Progammer/Analyst</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.pa"><catDesc>Assasin</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to1.ct"><catDesc>Chemistry teacher</catDesc></category>
          </category>
          <category>
            <catDesc>secondary</catDesc>
            <category xml:id="to2.hm"><catDesc>Courtmaster</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to2.dd"><catDesc>Drug dealer</catDesc></category>
            <category xml:id="to2.em"><catDesc>Embezzler</catDesc></category>
          </category>
        </taxonomy>
      </classDecl>
    </encodingDesc>
  </teiHeader>
  <text>
    <body>
      <listPerson>
        <person xml:id="WW">
          <persName>White, Walter</persName>
          <occupation from="1992" to="2013" code="#to1.ct"/>
          <occupation from="2008" to="2013" code="#to2.dd"/>
        </person>
      </listPerson>
    </body>
  </text>
</TEI>


> I am encoding a very detailed prosopography of a person that had
> many occupations with the element <occupation>. We would like to
> distinguish his “main” occupations from his “secondary”
> occupations. Here is an example:
>
> <person>
>
> <!— some elements here -->
>
> <occupation from="1785">Historiker</occupation>
>                <occupation>Jurist</occupation>
>                <occupation>Statistiker</occupation>
>
>                <occupation>Hofmeister / Söhne des Kanzlers von Gersdorff in
> Dresden 1743-46</occupation>
>                <occupation >PD philos. / Geschichte, Statistik, Natur- und
> Völkerrecht Marburg 1746-</occupation>
>                <occupation>aoP. philos. / Geschichte u. Statistik Göttingen
> 1748-</occupation>
>                <occupation>aoP. iur. / Göttingen April 1753-</occupation>
>
> <!— more elements here -->
>
> </person>
>
> For this reason, I had a look at the content model model.personPart
> <http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/ref-model.personPart.html>.
> Most of its elements accepts the attribute @role whereas only
> <persName>, <state> and <trait> accept the attribute @type.
>
> Can anyone explain why <occupation> is not permitted to contain a
> @type attribute? Or is there a better solution for my problem?



--
​Antonio Rojas Castro
Research assistant, Cologne Center for eHumanities
Communication coordinator, EADH


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Re: Why @type is not allowed in <occupation>

Syd Bauman-10
I've submitted ticket #1600 for this request.[1]

But just to make sure you know, it is quite reasonable to store the
<taxonomy> in an external file and then either

 a) XInclude it into your <teiHeader>,

 b) point directly to the external file (e.g.,
       <occupation code="occtax.xml#to2.dd"/>
    ), or

 c) point directly to the external file using a private scheme URI
    mapped out by a <prefixDef> in the <teiHeader> (e.g.,
       <occupation code="o:to2.dd"/>
    ).

Choice (c) is the easiest to encode, and the most robust & flexible;
but it is also a bit harder to set up and significantly harder to
write code to process. Choice (a) is only better than putting it in
your <teiHeader> by 1 step. (But at my project, that one step -- that
the people doing the encoding shouldn't have the burden of seeing or
dealing with the <taxonomy> -- is what we care about, so we use
choice (a) for now.) My sense is that most projects lean towards (b),
but that is based on scant and ill-recalled evidence of people who
were *planning* to use <taxonomy> in their projects, not actually
doing so much yet. :-)

And, of course, the same three possibilities could be used for your
prosopographic data, too.

> I would prefer to keep the teiHeader simple and avoid taxonomies
> because we are dealing winth a lot of prosopographic entries.
>
> Said that, can anyone tell me more about the reasoning behind the @type
> attribute? I still think it would be the best approach.

Notes
-----
 [1] See https://github.com/TEIC/TEI/issues/1600. If you have a
     GitHub account (and maybe if not, idunno) you can arrange to get
     notifications when the ticket is updated by clicking on the
     "Watch" button near the upper right.
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Re: Why @type is not allowed in <occupation>

ANTONIO ROJAS CASTRO
Thank you Syd for all these great suggestions.

We actually are just interested in distinguishing “main” professions from “others” whereas the “main” of person A might be the “other” of person B.

At the moment we cannot model a whole taxonomy for all the entries but I am wondering whether this could be a workaround. 

TeiHeader:

<encodingDesc>
         <classDecl>
            <taxonomy>
               <category xml:id="main">
                  <catDesc>Main occupation</catDesc>
               </category>
               <category xml:id="other">
                  <catDesc>Secondary occupation</catDesc>
               </category>
            </taxonomy>
         </classDecl>
      </encodingDesc>


Person in the body:


               <occupation from="1785" code=“#main">Historiker</occupation>
               <occupation code="#main">Jurist</occupation>
               <occupation code="#main">Statistiker</occupation>
               <occupation code="#other">Hofmeister / Söhne des Kanzlers von Gersdorff in Dresden 1743-46</occupation>


Thanks for your feedback.


Best,


-- 
Dr. Antonio Rojas Castro
Researcher, Cologne Center for eHumanities
Communication coordinator, EADH

El 4 de marzo de 2017 a las 17:15:38, Syd Bauman ([hidden email]) escribió:

I've submitted ticket #1600 for this request.[1]

But just to make sure you know, it is quite reasonable to store the
<taxonomy> in an external file and then either

a) XInclude it into your <teiHeader>,

b) point directly to the external file (e.g.,
<occupation code="occtax.xml#to2.dd"/>
), or

c) point directly to the external file using a private scheme URI
mapped out by a <prefixDef> in the <teiHeader> (e.g.,
<occupation code="o:to2.dd"/>
).

Choice (c) is the easiest to encode, and the most robust & flexible;
but it is also a bit harder to set up and significantly harder to
write code to process. Choice (a) is only better than putting it in
your <teiHeader> by 1 step. (But at my project, that one step -- that
the people doing the encoding shouldn't have the burden of seeing or
dealing with the <taxonomy> -- is what we care about, so we use
choice (a) for now.) My sense is that most projects lean towards (b),
but that is based on scant and ill-recalled evidence of people who
were *planning* to use <taxonomy> in their projects, not actually
doing so much yet. :-)

And, of course, the same three possibilities could be used for your
prosopographic data, too.

> I would prefer to keep the teiHeader simple and avoid taxonomies
> because we are dealing winth a lot of prosopographic entries.
>
> Said that, can anyone tell me more about the reasoning behind the @type
> attribute? I still think it would be the best approach.

Notes
-----
[1] See https://github.com/TEIC/TEI/issues/1600. If you have a
GitHub account (and maybe if not, idunno) you can arrange to get
notifications when the ticket is updated by clicking on the
"Watch" button near the upper right.
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