ampersands and checklists

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ampersands and checklists

Easterly, Joseph
Hi folks,

I'm working on encoding a handwritten police ledger dating from 1913. In it, the police officer is documenting, essentially in paragraph form, everyone who visits her in the police station. There might be a passage such as the following:

Reported for duty at 8. A. M. Cap't McAlister. Ins. Ryan x Mr & Mrs Dewolf x Sidney De Wolf - Mrs Armstrong x  Mrs Glich x Mrs Cutter x Mrs Offerman Gussie Lukowitz called - Attended Men's Court.

We've encoded about 25 pages so far of a 400 page ledger, and thus far we assumed that the x marks — which only appear between names — were ampersands. She never uses ampersands anywhere else, only "and." Today was the first time I saw what is incontestably an ampersand in the phrase "Mr & Mrs Dewolf," and it resembles a "+" with the lines joined, cursive style. This has me wondering what all of those exes are. I'm wondering if the police officer is checking names off of a list, perhaps documenting for herself that some other corresponding action (perhaps paperwork?) has been completed for these people.

In TEI, how does one encode a check mark or some other character? Is this a case where <metamark> would be used?

thanks,

Joe Easterly
Digital Humanities Librarian
University of Rochester River Campus Libraries
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Re: ampersands and checklists

Martin Holmes
Hi Joe,

On the minor issue of how to transcribe the x symbols, if you're not
happy using an actual x, there are lots of other options in Unicode:

U+274C
U+2A2F
U+2573

and various others. If none of those fit, there's <g>, of course.

Cheers,
Martin

On 2018-06-05 01:24 PM, Joe Easterly wrote:

> Hi folks,
>
> I'm working on encoding a handwritten police ledger dating from 1913. In
> it, the police officer is documenting, essentially in paragraph form,
> everyone who visits her in the police station. There might be a passage
> such as the following:
>
>     Reported for duty at 8. A. M. Cap't McAlister. Ins. Ryan x Mr & Mrs
>     Dewolf x Sidney De Wolf - Mrs Armstrong x  Mrs Glich x Mrs Cutter x
>     Mrs Offerman Gussie Lukowitz called - Attended Men's Court.
>
>
> We've encoded about 25 pages so far of a 400 page ledger, and thus far
> we assumed that the x marks — which only appear between names — were
> ampersands. She never uses ampersands anywhere else, only "and." Today
> was the first time I saw what is incontestably an ampersand in the
> phrase "Mr & Mrs Dewolf," and it resembles a "+" with the lines joined,
> cursive style. This has me wondering what all of those exes are. I'm
> wondering if the police officer is checking names off of a list, perhaps
> documenting for herself that some other corresponding action (perhaps
> paperwork?) has been completed for these people.
>
> In TEI, how does one encode a check mark or some other character? Is
> this a case where <metamark> would be used?
>
> thanks,
>
> Joe Easterly
> Digital Humanities Librarian
> University of Rochester River Campus Libraries
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Re: ampersands and checklists

Peter Flynn-8
In reply to this post by Easterly, Joseph
On 05/06/18 21:24, Joe Easterly wrote:

> Hi folks,
>
> I'm working on encoding a handwritten police ledger dating from 1913. In
> it, the police officer is documenting, essentially in paragraph form,
> everyone who visits her in the police station. There might be a passage
> such as the following:
>
>     Reported for duty at 8. A. M. Cap't McAlister. Ins. Ryan x Mr & Mrs
>     Dewolf x Sidney De Wolf - Mrs Armstrong x  Mrs Glich x Mrs Cutter x
>     Mrs Offerman Gussie Lukowitz called - Attended Men's Court.
>
>
> We've encoded about 25 pages so far of a 400 page ledger, and thus far
> we assumed that the x marks — which only appear between names — were
> ampersands. She never uses ampersands anywhere else, only "and." Today
> was the first time I saw what is incontestably an ampersand in the
> phrase "Mr & Mrs Dewolf," and it resembles a "+" with the lines joined,
> cursive style. This has me wondering what all of those exes are.

Are they written as handwriting-exes, or formed more like multiplication
signs, or (as you surmise) as checkmarks? Does the construct Mr x Mrs
[name] occur anywhere? I was wondering if the x was used as an ampersand
but when it have to a couple, they got a real ampersand.

> I'm
> wondering if the police officer is checking names off of a list, perhaps
> documenting for herself that some other corresponding action (perhaps
> paperwork?) has been completed for these people.

"If you want to know the time ask a p'liceman"...find the oldest retired
officer you can and ask them?

> In TEI, how does one encode a check mark or some other character? Is
> this a case where <metamark> would be used?

If it was actually a mark made to check off a list, I'd use a ✗ but
Unicode has unfortunately imposed a set of semantics to do with ballots,
which is irrelevant here and may confuse some users; and what it calls a
checkmark is what UK English calls a tick. If it looks like an x I'd
encode it as an x and use whatever markup you feel suitable to explain
its role.

///Peter
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Re: ampersands and checklists

De Tienne, Andre
In reply to this post by Easterly, Joseph
The x may be a mark indicating a grouping of people that showed up at the same time. First Cap’t McAlister arrived at 8 AM sharp. Followed by a group of people including Ins. Ryan, Mr & Mrs Dewolf, and Sidney De Wolf. Some moment later Mrss. Armstrong, Glich, Cutter, and Offerman arrived together. Thus the x sign could point to some sort of space/time coincidence among the people so associated, something not so well conveyed by an ampersand, a + sign, or the conjunction “and”. This is mere speculation of course: examination of all other occurrences might confirm or invalidate the possibility.

André De Tienne

-----------------------

André De Tienne, Ph.D.

Director and General Editor

Peirce Edition Project

Institute for American Thought


Indiana University School of Liberal Arts


From: "TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) public discussion list" <[hidden email]> on behalf of Joe Easterly <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: Joe Easterly <[hidden email]>
Date: Tuesday, June 5, 2018 at 4:24 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: ampersands and checklists

Hi folks,

I'm working on encoding a handwritten police ledger dating from 1913. In it, the police officer is documenting, essentially in paragraph form, everyone who visits her in the police station. There might be a passage such as the following:

Reported for duty at 8. A. M. Cap't McAlister. Ins. Ryan x Mr & Mrs Dewolf x Sidney De Wolf - Mrs Armstrong x  Mrs Glich x Mrs Cutter x Mrs Offerman Gussie Lukowitz called - Attended Men's Court.

We've encoded about 25 pages so far of a 400 page ledger, and thus far we assumed that the x marks — which only appear between names — were ampersands. She never uses ampersands anywhere else, only "and." Today was the first time I saw what is incontestably an ampersand in the phrase "Mr & Mrs Dewolf," and it resembles a "+" with the lines joined, cursive style. This has me wondering what all of those exes are. I'm wondering if the police officer is checking names off of a list, perhaps documenting for herself that some other corresponding action (perhaps paperwork?) has been completed for these people.

In TEI, how does one encode a check mark or some other character? Is this a case where <metamark> would be used?

thanks,

Joe Easterly
Digital Humanities Librarian
University of Rochester River Campus Libraries
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Re: ampersands and checklists

Paul Schaffner
Just as a general philosophy, born of many many times
when I did not know what the text was doing, or meant...

(1) if you know what the text is doing, encode that;
(2) if you what the character means but not how it is functioning, encode that.
(3) if all you know is what the glyph looks like, then fall back on that.

By this principle, I'd capture as some sort of 'x' or '+';
if you must capture its distinctiveness and your doubt, then
use <g>, defining the character basically as 'this x-shaped thing
that may mean a tick or who knows what.'

pfs

On Tue, Jun 5, 2018, at 17:54, De Tienne, Andre wrote:

> The x may be a mark indicating a grouping of people that showed up at
> the same time. First Cap’t McAlister arrived at 8 AM sharp. Followed by
> a group of people including Ins. Ryan, Mr & Mrs Dewolf, and Sidney De
> Wolf. Some moment later Mrss. Armstrong, Glich, Cutter, and Offerman
> arrived together. Thus the x sign could point to some sort of space/time
> coincidence among the people so associated, something not so well
> conveyed by an ampersand, a + sign, or the conjunction “and”. This is
> mere speculation of course: examination of all other occurrences might
> confirm or invalidate the possibility.
>
> André De Tienne
>
> -----------------------
>
> André De Tienne, Ph.D.
>
> Director and General Editor
>
> Peirce Edition Project
>
> Institute for American Thought
>
>
> Indiana University School of Liberal Arts
>
>
> From: "TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) public discussion list" <TEI-
> [hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>> on behalf of Joe
> Easterly
> <[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>>
> Reply-To: Joe Easterly
> <[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>>
> Date: Tuesday, June 5, 2018 at 4:24 PM
> To: "[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>" <TEI-
> [hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>>
> Subject: ampersands and checklists
>
> Hi folks,
>
> I'm working on encoding a handwritten police ledger dating from 1913. In
> it, the police officer is documenting, essentially in paragraph form,
> everyone who visits her in the police station. There might be a passage
> such as the following:
>
> Reported for duty at 8. A. M. Cap't McAlister. Ins. Ryan x Mr & Mrs
> Dewolf x Sidney De Wolf - Mrs Armstrong x  Mrs Glich x Mrs Cutter x Mrs
> Offerman Gussie Lukowitz called - Attended Men's Court.
>
> We've encoded about 25 pages so far of a 400 page ledger, and thus far
> we assumed that the x marks — which only appear between names — were
> ampersands. She never uses ampersands anywhere else, only "and." Today
> was the first time I saw what is incontestably an ampersand in the
> phrase "Mr & Mrs Dewolf," and it resembles a "+" with the lines joined,
> cursive style. This has me wondering what all of those exes are. I'm
> wondering if the police officer is checking names off of a list, perhaps
> documenting for herself that some other corresponding action (perhaps
> paperwork?) has been completed for these people.
>
> In TEI, how does one encode a check mark or some other character? Is
> this a case where <metamark> would be used?
>
> thanks,
>
> Joe Easterly
> Digital Humanities Librarian
> University of Rochester River Campus Libraries


--
Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
University of Michigan Libraries
[hidden email] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/