<fw> and <floatingText>

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<fw> and <floatingText>

Jakub Simek
Dear list,

Would it be appropriate to think about <floatingText> as a wrapper for <fw>? If a project needs or wants to encode phenomena like running heads, page numbers, quire signatures or catchwords explicitly, these short "texts" regularly interrupt the main textual content. Suppose we encode them with <fw> as the Guidelines suggest and put such <fw>s somewhere inside the main text (to which they not really belong; possibly stating with @place their approximate real position), would the element <fw> itself already imply that its contents are not part of the running main text or would it be advisable to wrap it additionally with <floatingText>?

Or is <floatingText> not supposed to mark up such phenomena at all?

Are there any opinions about the interaction of these two elements?

Best wishes,
Jakub

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Dr. Jakub Simek
Heidelberg University Library
lou
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Re: <fw> and <floatingText>

lou
I think the semantics of <fw> are pretty clearly different from those of <floatingText>: the former concerns a paratextual intrusion into the textual stream, the latter a textual intrusion. You use <fw> for running heads, page signatures, page numbers etc. You use <floatingText> for an embedded text which interrupts the main text, to which the textual flow returns after it finishes, such as a framed narrative. You should put <fw> in the place that it occurs in your source, along with <pb/> for example.  You may of course want to mark up <fw> within <floatingText> if the floating text goes over more than one page, but I assume that's not what you mean.

On Wed, 31 Jul 2019 at 11:02, Jakub Simek <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear list,

Would it be appropriate to think about <floatingText> as a wrapper for <fw>? If a project needs or wants to encode phenomena like running heads, page numbers, quire signatures or catchwords explicitly, these short "texts" regularly interrupt the main textual content. Suppose we encode them with <fw> as the Guidelines suggest and put such <fw>s somewhere inside the main text (to which they not really belong; possibly stating with @place their approximate real position), would the element <fw> itself already imply that its contents are not part of the running main text or would it be advisable to wrap it additionally with <floatingText>?

Or is <floatingText> not supposed to mark up such phenomena at all?

Are there any opinions about the interaction of these two elements?

Best wishes,
Jakub

---
Dr. Jakub Simek
Heidelberg University Library