referencing a DB from <text>/<div>/<seg>

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referencing a DB from <text>/<div>/<seg>

Pierazzo, Elena
Hi folks!

I have a project that encodes reading reports within the archive of a given publishing house. In these reports, some editor reads a manuscripts and then she writes a report in which she says if this work should be published or not. These reports are sometimes formal forms (rarely), some other times they are included in letters; in many cases there are more reports with the same letter.

In order to capture the relationship among the different actors of the editorial reading process, we have created an RDB with entities like people, documents, literary works, reading reports and their supports.

Then I have a corpus of TEI files containing the transcription of the actual documents  from which I’d like to reference some records in my RDB. Now, in the case of people and places I can used the @key attribute from <placeName>, <persName> etc.,, but not such thing is available for <text>, <div> or <seg> which are the elements that we have chosen to encode the reading reports when they are a full letter or when they occur within the body of a letter (mind you, sometimes the reading report is a sentence only, or part of one, like: ”I agree with you, that manuscript is bad”). Any advice? I was thinking of adding @att.canonical to those elements, but I was wondering if I’m missing something.

Best,
Elena

__
Elena Pierazzo
Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
Tel. +33 4 76828032

Visiting Senior Research Fellow
King's College London
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London
WC2B 5RL


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Re: referencing a DB from <text>/<div>/<seg>

James Cummings-5

Hi Elena,


Is it that you are classifying these things as a category of types of possible things? (i.e. this bit is the reader's report,  and it says to reject it) Or that you want to point to the particular database entry for that reader's report which contains more details?


If the former I might be tempted to use @ana and point to a (separate) hierarchical taxonomy of multiple categories using a private URI syntax (documented with prefixDef in the header) which allows as many whitespace-separated values as you might want:


<div ana="myProject:ReaderReport myProject:RecommendReject">


pointing to a file with something like: 

 

<taxonomy>
  <category xml:id="docTypes">
     <catDesc>Document Types</catDesc>
     <category xml:id="ReaderReport">
        <catDesc>Reader Report</catDesc>
     </category>
     <category xml:id="Letter">
        <catDesc>Letter</catDesc>
     </category>
     <category xml:id="ReportForm">
        <catDesc>Report Form</catDesc>
     </category>
     ...
  </category>
  <category xml:id="ReaderRecommendation">
     <category xml:id="RecommendReject">
        <catDesc>Reader recommends rejecting</catDesc>
     </category>
     <category xml:id="RecommendAccept">
        <catDesc>Reader recommends accepting</catDesc>
     </category>
     <category xml:id="RecommendMinorCorrections">
        <catDesc>Reader recommends accepting pending minor corrections</catDesc>
     </category>
     ...
  </category>
</taxonomy>


If the latter I'd be more likely to consider @corresp to point to the database entry (also using a private URI syntax):

<div type="report" corresp="myProject:ABC123"> where ABC123 is a dereferenceable value that can be pointed to with a URI.


At least that is what occurs to me to begin with.


James 


--

Dr James Cummings, [hidden email]

School of English Literature, Language, and Linguistics, Newcastle University


From: TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) public discussion list <[hidden email]> on behalf of Pierazzo, Elena <[hidden email]>
Sent: 07 June 2018 15:35:34
To: [hidden email]
Subject: referencing a DB from <text>/<div>/<seg>
 
Hi folks!

I have a project that encodes reading reports within the archive of a given publishing house. In these reports, some editor reads a manuscripts and then she writes a report in which she says if this work should be published or not. These reports are sometimes formal forms (rarely), some other times they are included in letters; in many cases there are more reports with the same letter.

In order to capture the relationship among the different actors of the editorial reading process, we have created an RDB with entities like people, documents, literary works, reading reports and their supports.

Then I have a corpus of TEI files containing the transcription of the actual documents  from which I’d like to reference some records in my RDB. Now, in the case of people and places I can used the @key attribute from <placeName>, <persName> etc.,, but not such thing is available for <text>, <div> or <seg> which are the elements that we have chosen to encode the reading reports when they are a full letter or when they occur within the body of a letter (mind you, sometimes the reading report is a sentence only, or part of one, like: ”I agree with you, that manuscript is bad”). Any advice? I was thinking of adding @att.canonical to those elements, but I was wondering if I’m missing something.

Best,
Elena

__
Elena Pierazzo
Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
Tel. +33 4 76828032

Visiting Senior Research Fellow
King's College London
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London
WC2B 5RL


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Re: referencing a DB from <text>/<div>/<seg>

Martin Holmes
In reply to this post by Pierazzo, Elena
Hi Elena,

My first thought is to avoid @key, and use @ref with a private URI
schema and a prefixDef. That's less "magical" and more processable.

You could simply use @corresp on the other elements (assuming you don't
take a hard position on what @corresp means -- see
<https://github.com/TEIC/TEI/issues/1144>).

Cheers,
Martin

On 2018-06-07 07:35 AM, Pierazzo, Elena wrote:

> Hi folks!
>
> I have a project that encodes reading reports within the archive of a given publishing house. In these reports, some editor reads a manuscripts and then she writes a report in which she says if this work should be published or not. These reports are sometimes formal forms (rarely), some other times they are included in letters; in many cases there are more reports with the same letter.
>
> In order to capture the relationship among the different actors of the editorial reading process, we have created an RDB with entities like people, documents, literary works, reading reports and their supports.
>
> Then I have a corpus of TEI files containing the transcription of the actual documents  from which I’d like to reference some records in my RDB. Now, in the case of people and places I can used the @key attribute from <placeName>, <persName> etc.,, but not such thing is available for <text>, <div> or <seg> which are the elements that we have chosen to encode the reading reports when they are a full letter or when they occur within the body of a letter (mind you, sometimes the reading report is a sentence only, or part of one, like: ”I agree with you, that manuscript is bad”). Any advice? I was thinking of adding @att.canonical to those elements, but I was wondering if I’m missing something.
>
> Best,
> Elena
>
> __
> Elena Pierazzo
> Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
> Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
> Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
> BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
> Tel. +33 4 76828032
>
> Visiting Senior Research Fellow
> King's College London
> Department of Digital Humanities
> King's College London
> 26-29 Drury Lane
> London
> WC2B 5RL
>
>
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Re: referencing a DB from <text>/<div>/<seg>

Pierazzo, Elena
Thanks a lot all for the suggestions. I had considered @corresp but my reading of the Guidelines is that this is supposed to  point to another *element* (which i take it to be ”an XML element"), and not to the record of an external DB, but if you guys do not choke at the idea of me using @corresp that way, so be it!

Exporting a relational DB with plenty of tables with relation etc. to a personography is not feasible for two main reasons: first, the relations amongst the entities are not easily captured by XML, and second because we have more than people and places in it, i.e. reading reports, documents, formats, interactions…, so we use a mixed approach: TEI for documents and a DB for entities and their relations.

__
Elena Pierazzo
Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
Tel. +33 4 76828032

Visiting Senior Research Fellow
King's College London
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London
WC2B 5RL


> Le 7 juin 2018 à 17:57, Lou Burnard <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>
> You  could also just use a <note> or <ptr> within the elements concerned of course. The former would allow you to be more precise about why you're pointing to the RDB in this way.
>
> And why not export the RDB into a personography while you're at it?
>
> On 07/06/18 16:50, Martin Holmes wrote:
>> Hi Elena,
>>
>> My first thought is to avoid @key, and use @ref with a private URI schema and a prefixDef. That's less "magical" and more processable.
>>
>> You could simply use @corresp on the other elements (assuming you don't take a hard position on what @corresp means -- see <https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgithub.com%2FTEIC%2FTEI%2Fissues%2F1144&data=01%7C01%7Celena.pierazzo%40KCL.AC.UK%7Cb38bdc232e254928a78608d5cc8f6422%7C8370cf1416f34c16b83c724071654356%7C0&sdata=rjGtOjbkNInVIXIrfULWuYQ3%2B8OPWx4zNv9%2Fwjyyfw0%3D&reserved=0>).
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Martin
>>
>> On 2018-06-07 07:35 AM, Pierazzo, Elena wrote:
>>> Hi folks!
>>>
>>> I have a project that encodes reading reports within the archive of a given publishing house. In these reports, some editor reads a manuscripts and then she writes a report in which she says if this work should be published or not. These reports are sometimes formal forms (rarely), some other times they are included in letters; in many cases there are more reports with the same letter.
>>>
>>> In order to capture the relationship among the different actors of the editorial reading process, we have created an RDB with entities like people, documents, literary works, reading reports and their supports.
>>>
>>> Then I have a corpus of TEI files containing the transcription of the actual documents  from which I’d like to reference some records in my RDB. Now, in the case of people and places I can used the @key attribute from <placeName>, <persName> etc.,, but not such thing is available for <text>, <div> or <seg> which are the elements that we have chosen to encode the reading reports when they are a full letter or when they occur within the body of a letter (mind you, sometimes the reading report is a sentence only, or part of one, like: ”I agree with you, that manuscript is bad”). Any advice? I was thinking of adding @att.canonical to those elements, but I was wondering if I’m missing something.
>>>
>>> Best,
>>> Elena
>>>
>>> __
>>> Elena Pierazzo
>>> Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
>>> Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
>>> Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
>>> BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
>>> Tel. +33 4 76828032
>>>
>>> Visiting Senior Research Fellow
>>> King's College London
>>> Department of Digital Humanities
>>> King's College London
>>> 26-29 Drury Lane
>>> London
>>> WC2B 5RL
>>>
>>>
>

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Re: referencing a DB from <text>/<div>/<seg>

Abdullah Alger
It sounds like you're making it really difficult for yourself by using a relational database. The way you're using your data is more like a graph, where connections between various "things", or nodes, is how you're going to connect and query relationships anyway. It's easier then just to use a graph database and call it a day, rather than setting up multiple tables, and then multiple joins tables for connections between nodes. 

Using a graph database would allow you to keep each person, document, note, etc. separate, then create multiple connections between them. You could do this with a relational database, but it's a lot harder to do. What adds to the problems is if your relational database is not tuned accordingly for performance. It's going to be a lot slower to search through all these relationships between data you've set up. Thus a graph database again is the way to go. 

On Fri, Jun 8, 2018, 01:40 Pierazzo, Elena <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks a lot all for the suggestions. I had considered @corresp but my reading of the Guidelines is that this is supposed to  point to another *element* (which i take it to be ”an XML element"), and not to the record of an external DB, but if you guys do not choke at the idea of me using @corresp that way, so be it!

Exporting a relational DB with plenty of tables with relation etc. to a personography is not feasible for two main reasons: first, the relations amongst the entities are not easily captured by XML, and second because we have more than people and places in it, i.e. reading reports, documents, formats, interactions…, so we use a mixed approach: TEI for documents and a DB for entities and their relations.

__
Elena Pierazzo
Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
Tel. +33 4 76828032

Visiting Senior Research Fellow
King's College London
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London
WC2B 5RL


> Le 7 juin 2018 à 17:57, Lou Burnard <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>
> You  could also just use a <note> or <ptr> within the elements concerned of course. The former would allow you to be more precise about why you're pointing to the RDB in this way.
>
> And why not export the RDB into a personography while you're at it?
>
> On 07/06/18 16:50, Martin Holmes wrote:
>> Hi Elena,
>>
>> My first thought is to avoid @key, and use @ref with a private URI schema and a prefixDef. That's less "magical" and more processable.
>>
>> You could simply use @corresp on the other elements (assuming you don't take a hard position on what @corresp means -- see <https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgithub.com%2FTEIC%2FTEI%2Fissues%2F1144&data=01%7C01%7Celena.pierazzo%40KCL.AC.UK%7Cb38bdc232e254928a78608d5cc8f6422%7C8370cf1416f34c16b83c724071654356%7C0&sdata=rjGtOjbkNInVIXIrfULWuYQ3%2B8OPWx4zNv9%2Fwjyyfw0%3D&reserved=0>).
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Martin
>>
>> On 2018-06-07 07:35 AM, Pierazzo, Elena wrote:
>>> Hi folks!
>>>
>>> I have a project that encodes reading reports within the archive of a given publishing house. In these reports, some editor reads a manuscripts and then she writes a report in which she says if this work should be published or not. These reports are sometimes formal forms (rarely), some other times they are included in letters; in many cases there are more reports with the same letter.
>>>
>>> In order to capture the relationship among the different actors of the editorial reading process, we have created an RDB with entities like people, documents, literary works, reading reports and their supports.
>>>
>>> Then I have a corpus of TEI files containing the transcription of the actual documents  from which I’d like to reference some records in my RDB. Now, in the case of people and places I can used the @key attribute from <placeName>, <persName> etc.,, but not such thing is available for <text>, <div> or <seg> which are the elements that we have chosen to encode the reading reports when they are a full letter or when they occur within the body of a letter (mind you, sometimes the reading report is a sentence only, or part of one, like: ”I agree with you, that manuscript is bad”). Any advice? I was thinking of adding @att.canonical to those elements, but I was wondering if I’m missing something.
>>>
>>> Best,
>>> Elena
>>>
>>> __
>>> Elena Pierazzo
>>> Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
>>> Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
>>> Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
>>> BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
>>> Tel. +33 4 76828032
>>>
>>> Visiting Senior Research Fellow
>>> King's College London
>>> Department of Digital Humanities
>>> King's College London
>>> 26-29 Drury Lane
>>> London
>>> WC2B 5RL
>>>
>>>
>

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Re: referencing a DB from <text>/<div>/<seg>

Pierazzo, Elena
Thanks a lot for the suggestion, and in fact we did consider a graph DB for a while; eventually we chose to work with a Django framework that embeds a mySQL DB for various reasons ans now the DB is already in place and works well for us. What we need now is to find a neat way to connect the documents we are transcribing in TEI with it.


Le 8 juin 2018 à 12:09, Abdullah Alger <[hidden email]> a écrit :

It sounds like you're making it really difficult for yourself by using a relational database. The way you're using your data is more like a graph, where connections between various "things", or nodes, is how you're going to connect and query relationships anyway. It's easier then just to use a graph database and call it a day, rather than setting up multiple tables, and then multiple joins tables for connections between nodes. 

Using a graph database would allow you to keep each person, document, note, etc. separate, then create multiple connections between them. You could do this with a relational database, but it's a lot harder to do. What adds to the problems is if your relational database is not tuned accordingly for performance. It's going to be a lot slower to search through all these relationships between data you've set up. Thus a graph database again is the way to go. 

On Fri, Jun 8, 2018, 01:40 Pierazzo, Elena <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks a lot all for the suggestions. I had considered @corresp but my reading of the Guidelines is that this is supposed to  point to another *element* (which i take it to be ”an XML element"), and not to the record of an external DB, but if you guys do not choke at the idea of me using @corresp that way, so be it!

Exporting a relational DB with plenty of tables with relation etc. to a personography is not feasible for two main reasons: first, the relations amongst the entities are not easily captured by XML, and second because we have more than people and places in it, i.e. reading reports, documents, formats, interactions…, so we use a mixed approach: TEI for documents and a DB for entities and their relations.

__
Elena Pierazzo
Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
Tel. +33 4 76828032

Visiting Senior Research Fellow
King's College London
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London
WC2B 5RL


> Le 7 juin 2018 à 17:57, Lou Burnard <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>
> You  could also just use a <note> or <ptr> within the elements concerned of course. The former would allow you to be more precise about why you're pointing to the RDB in this way.
>
> And why not export the RDB into a personography while you're at it?
>
> On 07/06/18 16:50, Martin Holmes wrote:
>> Hi Elena,
>>
>> My first thought is to avoid @key, and use @ref with a private URI schema and a prefixDef. That's less "magical" and more processable.
>>
>> You could simply use @corresp on the other elements (assuming you don't take a hard position on what @corresp means -- see <https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgithub.com%2FTEIC%2FTEI%2Fissues%2F1144&data=01%7C01%7Celena.pierazzo%40KCL.AC.UK%7Cb38bdc232e254928a78608d5cc8f6422%7C8370cf1416f34c16b83c724071654356%7C0&sdata=rjGtOjbkNInVIXIrfULWuYQ3%2B8OPWx4zNv9%2Fwjyyfw0%3D&reserved=0>).
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Martin
>>
>> On 2018-06-07 07:35 AM, Pierazzo, Elena wrote:
>>> Hi folks!
>>>
>>> I have a project that encodes reading reports within the archive of a given publishing house. In these reports, some editor reads a manuscripts and then she writes a report in which she says if this work should be published or not. These reports are sometimes formal forms (rarely), some other times they are included in letters; in many cases there are more reports with the same letter.
>>>
>>> In order to capture the relationship among the different actors of the editorial reading process, we have created an RDB with entities like people, documents, literary works, reading reports and their supports.
>>>
>>> Then I have a corpus of TEI files containing the transcription of the actual documents  from which I’d like to reference some records in my RDB. Now, in the case of people and places I can used the @key attribute from <placeName>, <persName> etc.,, but not such thing is available for <text>, <div> or <seg> which are the elements that we have chosen to encode the reading reports when they are a full letter or when they occur within the body of a letter (mind you, sometimes the reading report is a sentence only, or part of one, like: ”I agree with you, that manuscript is bad”). Any advice? I was thinking of adding @att.canonical to those elements, but I was wondering if I’m missing something.
>>>
>>> Best,
>>> Elena
>>>
>>> __
>>> Elena Pierazzo
>>> Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
>>> Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
>>> Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
>>> BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
>>> Tel. +33 4 76828032
>>>
>>> Visiting Senior Research Fellow
>>> King's College London
>>> Department of Digital Humanities
>>> King's College London
>>> 26-29 Drury Lane
>>> London
>>> WC2B 5RL
>>>
>>>
>


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Re: referencing a DB from <text>/<div>/<seg>

richard light

On 08/06/2018 11:21, Pierazzo, Elena wrote:
Thanks a lot for the suggestion, and in fact we did consider a graph DB for a while; eventually we chose to work with a Django framework that embeds a mySQL DB for various reasons ans now the DB is already in place and works well for us. What we need now is to find a neat way to connect the documents we are transcribing in TEI with it.
Implement persistent URLs and a Linked Data interface in front of your mySQL database?  I did that for Modes by writing a 404 Not Found handler.

Richard



Le 8 juin 2018 à 12:09, Abdullah Alger <[hidden email]> a écrit :

It sounds like you're making it really difficult for yourself by using a relational database. The way you're using your data is more like a graph, where connections between various "things", or nodes, is how you're going to connect and query relationships anyway. It's easier then just to use a graph database and call it a day, rather than setting up multiple tables, and then multiple joins tables for connections between nodes. 

Using a graph database would allow you to keep each person, document, note, etc. separate, then create multiple connections between them. You could do this with a relational database, but it's a lot harder to do. What adds to the problems is if your relational database is not tuned accordingly for performance. It's going to be a lot slower to search through all these relationships between data you've set up. Thus a graph database again is the way to go. 

On Fri, Jun 8, 2018, 01:40 Pierazzo, Elena <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks a lot all for the suggestions. I had considered @corresp but my reading of the Guidelines is that this is supposed to  point to another *element* (which i take it to be ”an XML element"), and not to the record of an external DB, but if you guys do not choke at the idea of me using @corresp that way, so be it!

Exporting a relational DB with plenty of tables with relation etc. to a personography is not feasible for two main reasons: first, the relations amongst the entities are not easily captured by XML, and second because we have more than people and places in it, i.e. reading reports, documents, formats, interactions…, so we use a mixed approach: TEI for documents and a DB for entities and their relations.

__
Elena Pierazzo
Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
Tel. +33 4 76828032

Visiting Senior Research Fellow
King's College London
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London
WC2B 5RL


> Le 7 juin 2018 à 17:57, Lou Burnard <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>
> You  could also just use a <note> or <ptr> within the elements concerned of course. The former would allow you to be more precise about why you're pointing to the RDB in this way.
>
> And why not export the RDB into a personography while you're at it?
>
> On 07/06/18 16:50, Martin Holmes wrote:
>> Hi Elena,
>>
>> My first thought is to avoid @key, and use @ref with a private URI schema and a prefixDef. That's less "magical" and more processable.
>>
>> You could simply use @corresp on the other elements (assuming you don't take a hard position on what @corresp means -- see <https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgithub.com%2FTEIC%2FTEI%2Fissues%2F1144&data=01%7C01%7Celena.pierazzo%40KCL.AC.UK%7Cb38bdc232e254928a78608d5cc8f6422%7C8370cf1416f34c16b83c724071654356%7C0&sdata=rjGtOjbkNInVIXIrfULWuYQ3%2B8OPWx4zNv9%2Fwjyyfw0%3D&reserved=0>).
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Martin
>>
>> On 2018-06-07 07:35 AM, Pierazzo, Elena wrote:
>>> Hi folks!
>>>
>>> I have a project that encodes reading reports within the archive of a given publishing house. In these reports, some editor reads a manuscripts and then she writes a report in which she says if this work should be published or not. These reports are sometimes formal forms (rarely), some other times they are included in letters; in many cases there are more reports with the same letter.
>>>
>>> In order to capture the relationship among the different actors of the editorial reading process, we have created an RDB with entities like people, documents, literary works, reading reports and their supports.
>>>
>>> Then I have a corpus of TEI files containing the transcription of the actual documents  from which I’d like to reference some records in my RDB. Now, in the case of people and places I can used the @key attribute from <placeName>, <persName> etc.,, but not such thing is available for <text>, <div> or <seg> which are the elements that we have chosen to encode the reading reports when they are a full letter or when they occur within the body of a letter (mind you, sometimes the reading report is a sentence only, or part of one, like: ”I agree with you, that manuscript is bad”). Any advice? I was thinking of adding @att.canonical to those elements, but I was wondering if I’m missing something.
>>>
>>> Best,
>>> Elena
>>>
>>> __
>>> Elena Pierazzo
>>> Professeure d’italien et humanités numériques
>>> Université Grenoble-Alpes - LUHCIE
>>> Bureau Bâtiment 'Stendhal’ F307
>>> BP 25 38040 Grenoble Cedex 9
>>> Tel. +33 4 76828032
>>>
>>> Visiting Senior Research Fellow
>>> King's College London
>>> Department of Digital Humanities
>>> King's College London
>>> 26-29 Drury Lane
>>> London
>>> WC2B 5RL
>>>
>>>
>



--
Richard Light